Do you have a Candidate driven process?

01272015Having a great candidate experience should always be a key objective when creating talent acquisition processes or programs. Not only because it feels good to treat people well, but it is critical if you want to hire great people and enhance your reputation in the marketplace. Here are some components that could be baked into your process.

1. Start the conversation with the aim of understanding the candidates’ true motivational factors, not why they are interested in a specific role. This helps to qualify that the opportunity is the right long term match, helping assure the candidate will stay in the role and/or company for a longer period of time. What we are first looking for is an overview of the candidates push why they want to leave/left) and pull (what role/company would attract them) factors. It is beneficial to understand this early in the process, as the candidate knows less about the company/role and therefore is less likely to be able to adapt their communication to what he/she thinks the hiring authority wants to hear.

Another benefit of this is making the candidate feel that you actually are interested in him/her. This increases the likelihood the candidate will treat you with increased respect and transparency throughout the process, and also increases the chances the candidate will choose your company over the competition.

Questions such as “tell me why you are interested in this position”, could be rephrased to “what are the top four ingredients you are looking for in a role” or “if you would create your ideal position, how would it look like”.

2. Get an overview of where the candidates are in their process. Candidates have their own time frame; their own agendas and their own decision 12022014cmaking process. Find out who else they are interviewing with, how far they are in the process, and when they plan to make their decision. You then have the option to try to speed up your process, reject the candidate or ask the candidate to prolong their decision making process. The goal is to align your process with theirs.

3. Find out critical reasons why the candidates may fall out early. This includes things like, salary expectations, openness to travel, competition cclauses, if their partners support their career move, etc.

4. Once the candidate is being interviewed and has entered into the recruitment process, feed them pertinent company information. Data points that will help them learn more about your company, the market and/or the role. It takes a little time but is worth the investment and will make a big difference.

01212014c5. Test candidate commitment after each interview. Asking if the candidate would accept an offer knowing what they know today will increase their emotional commitment and also potentially reveal any obstacles or hesitations before going into the offer stage. Always start the conversation asking what has changed since the last conversation, things always change and it’s important to understand where the candidate is at mentally.Follow up with the candidate once they have started in their new role. You have spent weeks and months building trust with the candidate and have made positive deposits into their emotional bank account. It is more likely that the candidate (employee) will reveal not only positive but also negative feedback to you, which can help in improving their situation and also help in streamlining and perfecting the recruitment process.

6. Follow up with the candidate once they have started in their new role. You have spent weeks and months building trust with the candidate and have made positive deposits into their emotional bank account. It is more likely that the candidate (employee) will reveal not only the positive but also negative feedback to you, which can help in improving their situation and also help in streamlining and perfecting the recruitment process.

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